Will we ever get state standards for high school math in Indiana?

I probably should be figuring out what in the heck I’ll be teaching in Precalc tomorrow, but I’m just so frustrated I could scream.  So I decided to write and vent a bit…

Indiana has finally released its draft of new state standards for math and language arts for public comment.  Laudably, the Indiana Dept of Education is inviting teachers and the public to comment freely on the proposed standards before they are finalized.  After three years of having standards and then not having them finished yet and then having different ones and then changing those again and then definitely going with Common Core and then definitely not going with Common Core, I was hoping that what the IDOE was promising–standards in place by April 1st–was finally going to happen.  However, here are the standards that they came up with–a laundry list of 139 algebra standards, 96 geometry standards, 80 data analysis, probability, and statistics standards, 70 discrete math standards, 51 calculus standards, 24 “process, problem-solving, practice” standards, and a few misc others.  The standards are not divided in any way by subject or year, grouped by major content strands, or even organized sequentially in the order in which they would normally be taught.  There is not indication of how many courses would be required to teach all of these standards and which of these standards would be required for all students and which would be considered non-required or elective standards.  Basically, they just took our 2000 Indiana standards, our 2009 Indiana standards, the Common Core standards, NCTM standards, and possibly some other lists of standards and put them all together into one really lo-o-o-ong list with no organization whatsoever.  Talk about a mile wide and an inch deep!!  There is absolutely no way that they are going to have the high school standards even close to done by April 1st.  So, wearily we soldier on, never knowing if what we are teaching now is what they will want us to be teaching next year, and what they will be testing our students on the year after that.

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